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Blue supplies the green that will lead to better rural health care

We are thrilled that our Rural Health Summit is one of 31 projects selected for funding by the Blue & You Foundation for a Healthier Arkansas this year. Established by Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield in 2001, the Foundation is a separate nonprofit with the sole mission of funding projects in Arkansas that will improve health care in the state. The funding support from Blue & You allows us to keep participant costs low and bring in outside experts to make the most of our time with our participants. 

The initial planning for the Summit began with discussions about rural health care needs in Arkansas with Dr. Mark T. Jansen, director of regional programming at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and invested chair for Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield, George K. Mitchell, M.D., Endowed Chair in Primary Care. That conversation expanded to include other health care leaders who have a stake in raising the quality and availability of health care in rural areas. These leaders all supported creating a network of cross-collaboration among the many efforts currently operating in rural Arkansas and looking at manageable, short-term goals to address during the next year to two years. It is our belief that establishing such a network will be an important step toward creating a rural health care environment that will be more attractive to new physicians and foster an increase in quality care.

Near the end of March we will host the first Summit meeting to begin building that collaborative network of healthcare professionals and organizations. We’ll be joined by representatives of some of the state’s leading health groups and professional organizations for a facilitated two-day session to start the process, followed by regional visits and a larger Summit meeting later in the year. Our hope is to foster increased collaboration and resource sharing so that innovative health care solutions can be shared more readily in the state and incoming physicians will have established allies at all points of rural healthcare. 

We are extremely grateful to the Blue & You Foundation for their support. Above and beyond the monetary contribution, their backing of our effort and the 30 other recipients this year represents a belief that we will all be able to make a tangible difference in the state. Carrying that charge and that belief into our working sessions will further underscore the importance of coming together and empower our group to start tackling the challenges facing rural health.

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Art in its Natural State

To know why Arkansas is the Natural State, all one needs to do is take a short trip to Petit Jean Mountain. From impressive views of the Arkansas River Valley, to lakes and rivers, and wide fields and towering pines, Petit Jean offers a wonderful snapshot of Arkansas’ natural beauty. It’s no wonder that Petit Jean has also called to artists throughout the years, from Native American cave art all the way to modern day painters, sculptors and writers.

To celebrate that rich history and add to the artistic legacy of Petit Jean, we here at the Institute are partnering with Petit Jean State Park to host the first Art in its Natural State competition. We have worked with the Park to identify serval sites on our respective campuses that not only exemplify Petit Jean’s varied landscapes, but would also be a great spot for public art. Our contest challenges artists to design temporary, site-specific outdoor works for those areas. The best fit for the competition will likely be structural, sculptural or landscape art, but all designed public art will be considered. You can see all of the sites up for design here.

The artwork will be displayed in its outdoor site for up to one year, then taken down by the artist. The focus for the competition is a balance between the visual appeal of the created artwork and the natural beauty of the space it is designed for. The works must also have neutral impact to the site in which they are installed, meaning that after the works are removed and the area is allowed time to recover, it will be as if there was never any art installed at all.

The temporary nature of the installations is both respectful to Petit Jean’s environment and allows for artists to use creative materials that they might not otherwise work with. A bronze statue will withstand many decades of display, but our more ephemeral artworks needn’t be quite that durable. Though the works that are designed need to stand up to a year of seasonal weather, we hope that artists will incorporate recycled or recyclable materials for their work.  

We will take applications until September of this year, after which point all of the submitted designs will be considered by our judging and advisory panel. Made up of representatives from the Arkansas Arts Council; Arkansas Arts Center; Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism; Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art; University of Arkansas, Fayetteville; University of Arkansas at Fort Smith; University of Arkansas at Little Rock; the Park; and the Institute, our panel will select 10 winning designs. Those designs will be funded by a $5,000-per-artist stipend to cover the creation of the artwork and its transportation and installation on Petit Jean in March of 2018.

Although focused on the natural beauty of Petit Jean Mountain, the Art in its Natural State competition is open to all Southern and Arkansas regional artists. That includes artists from Arkansas, Alabama, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, West Virginia and Virginia. If you or someone you know is interested in entering the competition, the official rules and application guidelines for the competition can be found here

As we select winners and install the art, we’ll have plenty of updates here and on the Art in its Natural State page. Look for profiles of the winning artists, sneak peeks of the artwork and plenty of photos of the opening event on Saturday, March 10, 2018. Even better than seeing the art online, of course, will be to visit the art in person. We’ll have eight installed pieces at the Institute through March 2019, and the Park will host two installed works through July of 2018. We hope you’ll join us as we celebrate Arkansas’ beauty and the talents of Southern artists with the first Art in its Natural State competition.

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Surprise award

The Institute is extremely proud that Program Officer Samantha Evans was honored with the Arkansas Community Development Society’s New Professional Award. Samantha has been actively involved in community development, especially in Arkansas, for most of her professional years.

This past Friday, two representatives from the Society - including Whitney Horton, pictured above on the left with Sam on the right - came to the Winthrop Rockefeller Institute to surprise Sam with the award. Sam was very touched, as you can see on our Facebook page.

Sam comes from five years at Main Street Arkansas serving as its assistant director. In this position, she worked with numerous small- and medium-sized communities throughout the state of Arkansas where she worked to help interested citizens revitalize their downtown.

Sam served both on the board and as peer-elected chair of the Young Nonprofit Professionals of Little Rock. Under her leadership as the board chair, Little Rock was selected to host the annual Young Nonprofit Professional National Conference. It was a very successful event highlighting Change Through Head, Heart and Hands. The Change Through Head, Heart and Hands was a national nonprofit leadership conference that in August 2015 brought 150 young, emerging leaders from throughout the nation to Little Rock. Sam played a strong role in promoting central Arkansas tourism for attendees, further deepening the investment and experience attendees had while expanding the event’s economic impact.

She created the monthly speaker series “Coffee with an Expert,” which brings executive directors across various sectors together to speak with YNPN members.  She also developed a fundraising plan to increase membership and sponsorship for the local organization.

Before working for Main Street Arkansas, Sam was the planning technician for the city of North Little Rock for two years. Originally from Perry County, Sam, now of Conway, worked with her home community to help save the Rosenwald School in Bigelow, once listed as one of Arkansas’ Most Endangered Places. She’s written articles on a variety of issues concerning community development and planning including this one.

Sam holds a Professional Community and Economic Developer Certification from the Community Development Council. She has a master’s degree from the Humphry School of Public Affairs in City/Urban Planning with an emphasis in Community and Regional Planning.

She was selected as a Krusell Community Development Fellow and MacArthur Fellow in 2007 as a graduate student at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis. During her fellowships she worked with Model Cities CDC, a community-based development organization, and CommonBond, a large affordable housing development and management organization. Her placement experiences included: assisting with funding applications for tax credits; marketing research; data management and analysis; predevelopment planning and funding applications; assistance with façade improvement program; help with real estate closings. 

Sam is a regular speaker at conferences and events, including for the Community Development Institute, the National Main Streets Conference and innumerable local community sessions.

She received her undergraduate degree from Spelman College with a Bachelors of Arts in Political Science. In a nice Rockefeller connection, Spelman College, which was founded as the Atlanta Baptist Female Seminar, later changed in honor of Laura Spelman, John D. Rockefeller’s wife, and her parents, who were longtime activists in the anti-slavery movement. 

I had the privilege of working with Sam at a previous job, and I was thrilled when we got to be colleagues again here at the Institute. We’re very proud of her and look forward to seeing how her talent moves our programs forward in the future.

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Testing out some tastes

This week marked the kickoff for a new culinary experience at the Winthrop Rockefeller Institute. Our culinary director, Chef Robert Hall, has fielded many questions over the years about how various ingredients compare to one another.

“People want to know what the difference is between an ingredient from one place versus the same ingredient that’s from somewhere else,” he explains.

All those questions got Chef Hall to thinking, “maybe this would work as a culinary class.”

And so was born Taste Test, the newest addition to the Institute’s culinary lineup. These Thursday night classes only cost $15, and, true to its name, it’s all about testing out the tastes of one type of ingredient. But that ingredient might have a dozen or more iterations, divided by brand, geography or technique.

The opening class this week covered hot sauce. I’ve had the privilege of sitting through a number of Chef Hall’s other classes. I always learn something, and he’s usually kind enough to let me sample a bite of whatever he and/or the class is making.

But this time I got to go all in. He lined up 14 varieties of hot sauce, ranging from extremely mild (jalapeño-based) to slap-your-momma hot (ghost peppers). I’m not real adventurous when it comes to my palate. I certainly don’t eat things on a dare. But I decided to tough this one out. I tasted each variety, and of the first 12, only the red Tabasco made me reach for the sugar cubes Chef Hall had provided as a fire extinguisher.

We tried a chipotle sauce that was reminiscent of a spicy barbecue sauce. Then there was Chef Hall’s own homemade concoction, for which he used Fresno chilies. This was the class favorite in terms of flavor. We also got to try aji amarillo, a Peruvian sauce made from the pepper of the same name. This was a gift from our creative director, Sasha Cerrato, whose mother is from Peru.

Between each tasting, Chef Hall explained the science behind measuring Scoville units, the standard measurement for heat in spicy food. A jalapeño, for example, is measured at 3,000-5,000 Scoville units. This means that it would take roughly 3,000-5,000 cups of sugar dissolved in water to completely neutralize the heat in a jalapeño pepper.

Lucky No. 13 was a habanero-based sauce, and its heat clung to the roof of my mouth like peanut butter. It was uncomfortable enough that I determined I’d probably rather not reach for it the next time I wanted to give my food an extra kick, but my mouth recovered quickly, and I was no worse for the wear.

Then came the ghost pepper sauce. It was called Dave’s Gourmet Hot Sauce. Sounded harmless enough. I’m not sure who Dave is, but after one tiny taste of his sauce, I decided he’s not my friend.

It took about an hour – and lots of sugar cubes, plus some milk – for the heat to completely subside. That probably just means I have wimpy taste buds, as Chef Hall did point out that reactions to heat and spice in food are very subjective. I don’t mind admitting that. And I’ll be clear, while my sinuses were as open as they’ve been in a while, even the hottest sauce didn’t pose any real danger. Chef Hall made sure of that, and we all had plenty of fair warning. He explained before we dipped our spoons in Dave’s Gourmet Firestarter that ghost peppers measure at up to 800,000 Scoville units.

All in all, I learned a lot. Besides all the chemistry, I learned that there are a number of hot sauces that are quite tasty and add a welcome punch to various foods.

And then there’s Dave’s.

The next Taste Test class will be Feb. 16, and given it’s the week of Valentine’s Day, the star ingredient will be chocolate. Chef Hall gave me and a few co-workers a preview of the chocolate class earlier this week. Trust me when I say you’ll want to be there for that.

Other ingredients to be covered later in the year include olive oil (March 16), cheese (April 20) and bacon (Nov. 16).

Visit our culinary page for a full listing of Taste Test options. Just find Taste Test and then click the plus button to expand the list of individual classes.

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Dr. Ruth Hawkins to deliver keynote at Uncommon Communities session

PETIT JEAN MOUNTAIN, Ark. (Jan. 9, 2017) — Renowned heritage tourism expert Dr. Ruth Hawkins will deliver the keynote address at the January session of Uncommon Communities. Hawkins will deliver her keynote address at 12:30 p.m. Friday at the Winthrop Rockefeller Institute on Petit Jean Mountain.

Admission to the keynote address is free and open to the public, though advance registration is required. Those interested in registering should visit https://ruthhawkinsuncommoncommunities.eventbrite.com.

Hawkins is the director of Arkansas Heritage Sites at Arkansas State University. In this role, she has developed and directed the Hemingway-Pfeiffer Museum and Educational Center at Piggott, the Southern Tenant Farmers Museum at Tyronza, the Lakeport Plantation near Lake Village and the Historic Dyess Colony: Boyhood Home of Johnny Cash.

Hawkins’ presentation, titled “Using Your Community’s Heritage for Fun and Profit,” will cover ways in which small communities can use their own unique history to drive tourism and economic development.

“Dr. Hawkins is known throughout Arkansas as a leader in heritage tourism and historic preservation,” said Janet Harris, director of programs for the Rockefeller Institute. “The work she has done in northeast Arkansas and the Arkansas Delta has been transformative for those communities. We look forward to drawing from her insights into this important aspect of community and economic development.”

Uncommon Communities is a community and economic development initiative that provides participants, chosen by their respective communities, the opportunity to attend five carefully crafted sessions at the Winthrop Rockefeller Institute over the course of a year. Each of the five counties in the pilot group – Conway, Perry, Pope, Van Buren and Yell – is invited to send six participants to the sessions, which are held for a day and a half, every other month. The sessions were designed based on feedback from the counties when asked what skills and resources they needed to accomplish their goals and include: community leadership development, economic development in the new economy; tourism, marketing and branding; quality of place and placemaking; and exemplary communities moving forward. Each session brings renowned speakers from across the United States plus throughout Arkansas. In addition, many of the sessions are interactive and give participants the opportunity to work in groups and learn from other participating counties.

Uncommon Communities marries the wisdom and proven methodology of Dr. Vaughn Grisham, a celebrated community development expert and professor emeritus of sociology and founding director of the McLean Institute for Community Development at the University of Mississippi, with the award-winning Breakthrough Solutions partnership – under the direction of Dr. Mark Peterson at the University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service – and the expertise of Dr. Roby Robertson, retired professor of public administration and former director of the Institute of Government at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock.

Uncommon Communities is supported by a grant from the United States Department of Agriculture, and by Entergy.

 

About the Winthrop Rockefeller Institute

In 2005, the University of Arkansas System established the Winthrop Rockefeller Institute with a grant from the Winthrop Rockefeller Charitable Trust. By integrating the resources and expertise of the University of Arkansas System with the legacy and ideas of Gov. Winthrop Rockefeller, this educational institute and conference center creates an atmosphere where collaboration and change can thrive.

Program areas include Agriculture, Arts and Humanities, Civic Engagement, Economic Development, and Health. To learn more, call 501-727-5435, visit the website at www.rockefellerinstitute.org, or stay connected through Twitter and Facebook.

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Landowners workshop to highlight income diversity potential for timber producers

PETIT JEAN MOUNTAIN, Ark. (Dec. 13, 2016) — A one-day workshop for timber producers and other landowners will be held at the Winthrop Rockefeller Institute atop Petit Jean Mountain on Thursday, March 9. The workshop will cover a variety of topics, all related to helping landowners diversify their land’s income potential.

The workshop represents a partnership between the Winthrop Rockefeller Institute, the Natural Resource Enterprise program at Mississippi State University and the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture’s Cooperative Extension Service. Supporting the workshop are the Arkansas Forestry Association, the Arkansas Forestry Commission and the Arkansas Game & Fish Commission.

“This will be the third time we’ve partnered with the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture’s Cooperative Extension Service and Mississippi State’s NRE program to hold one of these workshops,” said Janet Harris, director of programs for the Rockefeller Institute. “Our past participants came away from the workshops equipped with fresh ideas about how their land can do more for them. We are excited to partner with these great organizations again.”

Among the scheduled speakers are area landowner Henry Jones; Adam Tullos and Daryl Jones of the Mississippi State University NRE program; Clint Johnson of the Arkansas Game & Fish Commission; Becky McPeake and Kyle Cunningham of the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture’s Cooperative Extension Service; Matthew Vandiver of JWB Company Inc.; and Nick Livers of Hyden, Miron & Foster, PLLC.

Topics to be covered at the workshop include outdoor business revenue potential and considerations; premises liability and legal considerations; forest management; estate planning; wildlife habitat management; and opportunities to see management prescriptions on a field tour.

“The field tour is always a highlight of these workshops,” Tullos said. “Nothing beats being able to get outdoors and seeing the concepts being discussed applied to real situations.”

This workshop’s focus on timber-producing land is a new angle for workshops held at the Institute.

“Our state is rich with timber land, and many farms that have grazing land or row-crop operations also produce timber,” McPeake said. “This workshop will be a great opportunity for many farmers to learn about things like wildlife management, restoration of native plant communities, estate planning and even the Farm Bill.”

To find more information or to register, go to RockefellerInstitute.org/forestry or contact Program Officer Samantha Evans at 501-727-6257 or sevans@uawri.org.

About Natural Resource Enterprises

The Natural Resource Enterprises program at Mississippi State University is a research and outreach program of the MSU Extension Service, MSU Forest and Wildlife Research Center, Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

About the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture

The University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture makes a positive impact for that key industry through the research done by the Arkansas Agricultural Experiment Station and the teaching done by the Cooperative Extension Service. Its mission is to advance the stewardship of natural resources and the environment, cultivate the improvement of agriculture and agribusiness, develop leadership skills and productive citizenship among youth and adults, enhance economic security and financial responsibility among the citizens of the state, ensure a safe, nutritious food supply, improve the quality of life in communities across Arkansas, and strengthen Arkansas families. You'll find the Division in all 75 Arkansas counties, on five university campuses, at five research and extension centers and at eight branch experiment stations.

About the Winthrop Rockefeller Institute

In 2005, the University of Arkansas System established the Winthrop Rockefeller Institute with a grant from the Winthrop Rockefeller Charitable Trust. By integrating the resources and expertise of the University of Arkansas System with the legacy and ideas of Gov. Winthrop Rockefeller, this educational institute and conference center creates an atmosphere where collaboration and change can thrive.

Program areas include Agriculture, Arts and Humanities, Civic Engagement, Economic Development, and Health. To learn more, call 501-727-5435, visit the website at www.rockefellerinstitute.org, or stay connected through Twitter and Facebook.

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Winthrop Rockefeller Institute releases 2017 culinary class lineup

PETIT JEAN MOUNTAIN, Ark. (Nov. 7, 2016) — The 2017 schedule of culinary classes at the Winthrop Rockefeller Institute was recently released and can be accessed at www.rockefellerinstittue.org/culinary.

The culinary classes, led by Certified Executive Chef Robert Hall, offer a variety of experiences for aspiring chefs of all skill levels – from “I’ve been cooking all my life” to “How do you boil water again?”

Returning to the culinary lineup is the ever-popular Table for Two, a date-night experience in which couples learn to cook a delicious four-course dinner under the instruction of Chef Hall. Other favorites like Made From Scratch – a demonstration class centered around specific culinary themes – and the Saturday Chef Series – a more hands-on approach to various culinary styles – are also back.

New to the 2017 lineup is Taste Test, a demonstration class in which participants will have the opportunity to taste styles of a particular ingredient from all over the world. Some of the ingredients that will be featured include hot sauce, chocolate, olive oil, tomatoes and bacon.

“The world is a cornucopia of flavor,” Hall said. “With this new class, we get to explore the amazing ways that different cultures treat the same ingredients. It promises to be a lot of fun, very yummy, and we’ll learn some things along the way.”

All of the Institute’s culinary offerings are listed at www.rockefellerinstitute.org/culinary, with links to registration for each category of class. Group reservations are available, and classes are perfect for a girls’ (or guys’) night out, a church or civic group activity, part of a weekend getaway or just because.

Beyond entertainment, the Institute’s culinary classes are intended to be informative and to strip away common fears and misconceptions about cooking.

“One of the central purposes of the Institute’s culinary program is to show how easy it is to cook from scratch,” Hall said. “It is my desire to help individuals and families return to ‘old-fashioned,’ ‘do-it-yourself,’ ‘made from scratch’ meal preparation. This will drastically reduce the use of processed foods, thus immediately making our diets healthier.

“By learning and using a handful of culinary techniques and methods, you can cook almost anything; it is my mission to provide you with several avenues to learn and master those skills.”

For more information, visit the website, email Chef Hall at rhall@uawri.org or call 501-727-5435.

About the Winthrop Rockefeller Institute

In 2005, the University of Arkansas System established the Winthrop Rockefeller Institute with a grant from the Winthrop Rockefeller Charitable Trust. By integrating the resources and expertise of the University of Arkansas System with the legacy and ideas of Gov. Winthrop Rockefeller, this educational institute and conference center creates an atmosphere where collaboration and change can thrive.

Program areas include Agriculture, Arts and Humanities, Civic Engagement, Economic Development, and Health. To learn more, call 501-727-5435, visit the website at www.rockefellerinstitute.org, or stay connected through Twitter and Facebook.

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Entrepreneurship expert to speak at Uncommon Communities

PETIT JEAN MOUNTAIN, Ark. (Oct. 21, 2016) — The keynote address for the November session of Uncommon Communities will be delivered by Steve Radley, president and CEO of NetWork Kansas.

Radley’s presentation, “The Entrepreneurship Edge: Creating a More Entrepreneurial Community,” will take place from noon to 2 p.m. Friday, Nov. 4, at the Winthrop Rockefeller Institute atop Petit Jean Mountain.

Radley’s address is open to the public and free of charge, though advance registration is required. Lunch can be purchased during registration.

Radley began his career in the private sector as the 28th employee of technology startup Brite Voice Systems, which grew from a worth of $6 million to more than $175 million. Since then, Radley has co-owned two businesses and serves on boards and advisory councils for the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City and various centers for entrepreneurship at higher education universities across the Midwest. He holds a Master of Business Administration from Wichita State University and a Master of Arts in Christian ministry from Friends University.

“Too often we get locked in to thinking about economic development as trying to attract the next super project,” said Janet Harris, director of programs for the Winthrop Rockefeller Institute. “Steve Radley will bring a refreshing perspective and key insight into the concept of ‘economic gardening,’ or how we grow our own success through entrepreneurialism.”

According to its website, “NetWork Kansas is devoted to the growth of entrepreneurship and small businesses throughout the state of Kansas. Our mission is to promote an entrepreneurial environment by providing a central portal that connects entrepreneurs and small business owners with the right resources—Expertise, Education and Economic Resources—when they are needed most. In pursuit of this mission, we partner with well-respected business development organizations and educational institutions that work with entrepreneurs and small business owners who have the vision and potential to succeed. The result is a seamless system that accelerates economic and community development in Kansas.”

To register or to learn more, go to www.rockefellerinstitute.org/uncommon or contact Program Officer Cary Tyson at ctyson@uawri.org.

Uncommon Communities is a community and economic development initiative that provides participants, chosen by their respective communities, the opportunity to attend five carefully crafted sessions at the Winthrop Rockefeller Institute over the course of a year. Each of the five counties in the pilot group – Conway, Perry, Pope, Van Buren and Yell – is invited to send six participants to the sessions, which are held for a day and a half, every other month. The sessions were designed based on feedback from the counties when asked what skills and resources they needed to accomplish their goals and include: community leadership development, economic development in the new economy; tourism, marketing and branding; quality of place and placemaking; and exemplary communities moving forward. Each session brings renowned speakers from across the United States plus throughout Arkansas. In addition, many of the sessions are interactive and give participants the opportunity to work in groups and learn from other participating counties.

Uncommon Communities marries the wisdom and proven methodology of Dr. Vaughn Grisham, a celebrated community development expert and professor emeritus of sociology and founding director of the McLean Institute for Community Development at the University of Mississippi, with the award-winning Breakthrough Solutions partnership – under the direction of Dr. Mark Peterson at the University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service – and the expertise of Dr. Roby Robertson, retired professor of public administration and former director of the Institute of Government at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock.

About the Winthrop Rockefeller Institute

In 2005, the University of Arkansas System established the Winthrop Rockefeller Institute with a grant from the Winthrop Rockefeller Charitable Trust. By integrating the resources and expertise of the University of Arkansas System with the legacy and ideas of Gov. Winthrop Rockefeller, this educational institute and conference center creates an atmosphere where collaboration and change can thrive.

Program areas include Agriculture, Arts and Humanities, Civic Engagement, Economic Development, and Health. To learn more, call 501-727-5435, visit the website at www.rockefellerinstitute.org, or stay connected through Twitter and Facebook.

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Where others saw a barn, she saw a story

It doesn’t just take an extraordinary amount of vision to think you can take a rundown barn and turn it into a top tourist destination; it takes an epic amount of work and no small dash of chutzpah. Neither was a problem for Dr. Ruth Hawkins when she took on the project of the Hemingway-Pfeiffer House in Piggott, Ark. Now if you’re a film buff, you’ll know that Piggott is where Eliza Kazan shot A Face in the Crowd starring Andy Griffith (before his eponymous television show), but in fact its place in history was cemented much earlier as the home of Earnest Hemingway’s second wife, Pauline Pfeiffer. Papa would visit Piggott in the 1930s, and the family turned the barn into a writing studio for Hemingway. It’s there where he wrote much of his epic A Farewell to Arms.

The story of the community and the site needed a champion. Locals knew of the visits and the writing, but sometimes it takes an outsider to help a place appreciate long overlooked jewels. That’s who Ruth Hawkins is – the kind of person who can see things others can’t. Where others saw an old barn, Ruth saw a story. She knows that heritage means business, but it has to be shined and made ready for the public. Today, the Hemingway Pfeiffer House is a destination for tourists all around. It’s the best example of the many, many jewels she’s found and cultivated throughout her beloved Arkansas Delta. It’s the best because she wasn’t simply satisfied in making the place a tourist destination. No, she had to go on and become a Hemingway scholar, presenting at conferences across the world and authoring the only book on Pauline, Unbelievable Happiness and Final Sorrow.

She’s the driving force of the restoration and major storyteller behind Lakeport Plantation in Lake Village, the only remaining antebellum plantation home on the Mississippi; she’s responsible for the Southern Tennent Farmers’ Museum in Tyronza, which tells the story of sharecropping and the organized farm labor movement; she is responsible for helping keep alive the story of Arkansas’ Japanese Internment Camp at Rohwer, where future Star Trek star George Takei was imprisoned; as well as the Historic Dyess Colony: Johnny Cash Boyhood Home. There’s more. She’s a member of the Arkansas Tourism Hall of Fame, Arkansas Tourism Person of the Year, she’s won a National Trust for Historic Preservation Honor Award as well as Preserve Arkansas’s Parker Westbrook Lifetime Achievement Award. The list goes on. If you want to learn how to capitalize on the heritage of your community, there is no better person in the world to learn from than Ruth Hawkins. She’ll be at the Winthrop Rockefeller Institute Friday from noon to 2 p.m. Get your tickets at https://ruthhawkinsuncommoncommunities.eventbrite.com.

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'Together we can become worthy of the moment'

Working at the Winthrop Rockefeller Institute and living atop Petit Jean Mountain, I am blessed with easy access to some of the prettiest scenic views in Arkansas. I can’t help but think that the picturesque vistas looking westward off of Petit Jean’s broad plateau is part of what kept Winthrop Rockefeller in Arkansas.

But Rockefeller’s view of Arkansas went well beyond his recognition of its natural beauty. From his farm, home and office on Petit Jean, he could see not just the physical attributes of the Arkansas River Valley, he cast a vision for the future of a state that, in the 1950s and ‘60s, was hanging in the balance.

That vision led him into politics, and 50 years ago today, he was sworn in as the 37th governor of the state of Arkansas.

A lot has changed in Arkansas in 50 years, and much of the positive change that has happened here can be traced back to the two terms that Winthrop Rockefeller served as governor.

Today I was privileged to sit in the gallery as Gov. Asa Hutchinson delivered his State of the State address to a joint assembly of the Arkansas Legislature. At the suggestion of our director of programs, Janet Harris, we reached out to the governor’s office to remind them that the State of the State address happened to fall on the monumental anniversary of Winthrop Rockefeller’s inauguration.

Gov. Hutchinson opened his address with a quote from Rockefeller’s inaugural speech:

“It is true that you have been allotted an unusual moment in the history of Arkansas, as have I … a moment subject to special scrutiny … laden with special challenges … and rich with special opportunities. I believe that together we can become worthy of the moment.”

Hutchinson followed that quote with a charge to the Legislature: “Today, we have our own moment in history, and we can only be worthy of this moment if we work together.”

Commitment to a collaborative approach to problem-solving was a hallmark of not just Winthrop Rockefeller’s administration, but his entire life. I was proud to hear that sentiment echoed 50 years from the time he first took office.

I was also struck by some of the parallels between the two governors’ priorities. Hutchinson today spoke of the need for more efficiency in government. This was also a priority of Rockefeller, who dramatically reduced the total number of state agencies during his tenure as governor.

Hutchinson touted recent economic development efforts throughout the state, citing Sig Sauer in Jacksonville, Sun Paper in Arkadelphia, Metova in Conway, Mars Petcare in Fort Smith, FMH Conveyors in Jonesboro and J.B. Hunt in Rogers. Before running for governor, Rockefeller served as the chair of the Arkansas Industrial Development Commission, a precursor to today’s Economic Development Commission. He helped usher in more than 600 new industries in Arkansas, resulting in more than $250 million in added salaries.

I’d like to think that if Gov. Rockefeller could have heard today’s State of the State address, he would be proud to hear how far we’ve come as a state. But he would also roll up his sleeves and prepare for the work yet to be done.

A mentor once told me that if I wanted to truly make a difference in my life, I needed to become a part of something that would outlive me. He also suggested that if we hope to see our work completed, we simply have not asked big enough questions. Winthrop Rockefeller personified this philosophy and dared to ask big questions. He took on challenges that he knew he would not live to see conquered.

As I reflect on the work of the Institute and on the indelible legacy of Winthrop Rockefeller on this important anniversary, I am inspired by his accomplishments, but also by his heart and his approach—which was to engage and empower others and to encourage them to aim high toward answering the big questions.

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