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Winthrop Rockefeller Institute Programs

Winthrop Rockefeller Institute Programs

Bringing together business, political and thought leaders to deepen understanding of a wide range of issues, technologies and ideas.

Our Programs

The Winthrop Rockefeller Institute carries on Gov. Rockefeller's legacy, working in concert with the University of Arkansas System, other educational institutions, and business, industry and government leaders to convene select groups in an environment that is uniquely conducive to the kind of collaboration that yields transformative results.

Program areas include agriculture, arts and humanities, civic engagement, economic development, and health – all key topics that are of great importance to Arkansas today, and the kinds of issues for which we believe Gov. Rockefeller would seek solutions.

Program Areas Include:

Agriculture
Arts and Humanities
Civic Engagement
Economic Development
Health

Although it is for his leadership of the state that Gov. Rockefeller is best remembered, he first came to Arkansas not to govern but to farm. Situated on part of the original Winrock Farms property, the Winthrop Rockefeller Institute carries forward Gov. Rockefeller's important work as an agricultural innovator. The Institute brings together agriculture experts, scholars and practitioners to advance and share ideas and practices that can help sustain a rapidly growing and changing world through the coming century.

It was Gov. Rockefeller’s mother, Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, who first spawned his love for and commitment to the arts. Gov. Rockefeller’s wife, Jeannette Edris Rockefeller — whose work and philanthropy made the long-dreamed-of Arkansas Arts Center a reality — shared that passion, and promoting the arts was of central importance to the Arkansas Rockefellers. It remains so for the Winthrop Rockefeller Institute, which nurtures the arts and humanities through instructional workshops, provides a venue for Arkansas' underserved rural population to appreciate visual and performing arts, and convenes gatherings to address key issues facing the arts community.

Perhaps Gov. Winthrop Rockefeller captured it best when he said, “Every citizen has the duty to be informed, to be thoughtfully concerned, and to participate in the search for solutions.” Through our innovative programs in the area of civic engagement, we explore and support all forms of civic participation, from creating and sustaining an informed electorate to building stronger communities by encouraging positive community involvement. By empowering Arkansas’ people to actively engage in responsible citizenhood, we can help make Arkansas a better place for all Arkansans.

When he arrived in Arkansas in 1953, Gov. Rockefeller found a state mired in what Time magazine described as a "dead-end economic and political condition." Named the first chair of the Arkansas Industrial Development Commission, Rockefeller convened members of the AIDC, along with a number of experts, at his farm atop Petit Jean Mountain to iron out a roadmap to economic development success. The result was 600 new industries, 90,000 new jobs and $240 million in new salaries. In the 21st century global economy, though, our state and region must again creatively adapt in order to survive and thrive. As a key catalyst in that process, the Winthrop Rockefeller Institute convenes government, business and other leaders to tackle the challenges Arkansas faces and advance the solutions that will drive us forward.

Continuing the Rockefeller family tradition of support for scientific research, the Winthrop Rockefeller Institute plays an active role in advancing both clinical medicine and public health, not only offering educational health retreats and workshops for the public, but also partnering with leading researchers and institutions to convene conferences that further understanding, disseminate knowledge and propose solutions in a variety of areas — ranging from Arkansas' public health issues to the use of nanotechnology in health care.

Upcoming Programs

Agriculture

Although it is for his leadership of the state that Gov. Rockefeller is best remembered, he first came to Arkansas not to govern but to farm. Situated on part of the original Winrock Farms property, the Winthrop Rockefeller Institute carries forward Gov. Rockefeller's important work as an agricultural innovator. The Institute brings together agriculture experts, scholars and practitioners to advance and share ideas and practices that can help sustain a rapidly growing and changing world through the coming century.

Arts and Humanities

It was Gov. Rockefeller’s mother, Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, who first spawned his love for and commitment to the arts. Gov. Rockefeller’s wife, Jeannette Edris Rockefeller — whose work and philanthropy made the long-dreamed-of Arkansas Arts Center a reality — shared that passion, and promoting the arts was of central importance to the Arkansas Rockefellers. It remains so for the Winthrop Rockefeller Institute, which nurtures the arts and humanities through instructional workshops, provides a venue for Arkansas' underserved rural population to appreciate visual and performing arts, and convenes gatherings to address key issues facing the arts community.

Civic Engagement

Perhaps Gov. Winthrop Rockefeller captured it best when he said, “Every citizen has the duty to be informed, to be thoughtfully concerned, and to participate in the search for solutions.” Through our innovative programs in the area of civic engagement, we explore and support all forms of civic participation, from creating and sustaining an informed electorate to building stronger communities by encouraging positive community involvement. By empowering Arkansas’ people to actively engage in responsible citizenhood, we can help make Arkansas a better place for all Arkansans.

Economic Development

When he arrived in Arkansas in 1953, Gov. Rockefeller found a state mired in what Time magazine described as a "dead-end economic and political condition." Named the first chair of the Arkansas Industrial Development Commission, Rockefeller convened members of the AIDC, along with a number of experts, at his farm atop Petit Jean Mountain to iron out a roadmap to economic development success. The result was 600 new industries, 90,000 new jobs and $240 million in new salaries. In the 21st century global economy, though, our state and region must again creatively adapt in order to survive and thrive. As a key catalyst in that process, the Winthrop Rockefeller Institute convenes government, business and other leaders to tackle the challenges Arkansas faces and advance the solutions that will drive us forward.

Health

Continuing the Rockefeller family tradition of support for scientific research, the Winthrop Rockefeller Institute plays an active role in advancing both clinical medicine and public health, not only offering educational health retreats and workshops for the public, but also partnering with leading researchers and institutions to convene conferences that further understanding, disseminate knowledge and propose solutions in a variety of areas — ranging from Arkansas' public health issues to the use of nanotechnology in health care.

Art in its Natural State

February 16, 2017 · 6:30 PM – Mar 1, 2019 · 5:00 PM

Arkansas is the “Natural State,” and Petit Jean Mountain makes it easy to see why. From towering pines to open fields to sparkling lakes, Petit Jean offers stunning vistas at every turn. The Art in its Natural State competition is a regional competition for the creation of 10 temporary, outdoor artworks to be displayed among that natural beauty here at the Winthrop Rockefeller Institute and Petit Jean State Park.

Past Programs

Agriculture

Although it is for his leadership of the state that Gov. Rockefeller is best remembered, he first came to Arkansas not to govern but to farm. Situated on part of the original Winrock Farms property, the Winthrop Rockefeller Institute carries forward Gov. Rockefeller's important work as an agricultural innovator. The Institute brings together agriculture experts, scholars and practitioners to advance and share ideas and practices that can help sustain a rapidly growing and changing world through the coming century.

Arts and Humanities

It was Gov. Rockefeller’s mother, Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, who first spawned his love for and commitment to the arts. Gov. Rockefeller’s wife, Jeannette Edris Rockefeller — whose work and philanthropy made the long-dreamed-of Arkansas Arts Center a reality — shared that passion, and promoting the arts was of central importance to the Arkansas Rockefellers. It remains so for the Winthrop Rockefeller Institute, which nurtures the arts and humanities through instructional workshops, provides a venue for Arkansas' underserved rural population to appreciate visual and performing arts, and convenes gatherings to address key issues facing the arts community.

Civic Engagement

Perhaps Gov. Winthrop Rockefeller captured it best when he said, “Every citizen has the duty to be informed, to be thoughtfully concerned, and to participate in the search for solutions.” Through our innovative programs in the area of civic engagement, we explore and support all forms of civic participation, from creating and sustaining an informed electorate to building stronger communities by encouraging positive community involvement. By empowering Arkansas’ people to actively engage in responsible citizenhood, we can help make Arkansas a better place for all Arkansans.

Economic Development

When he arrived in Arkansas in 1953, Gov. Rockefeller found a state mired in what Time magazine described as a "dead-end economic and political condition." Named the first chair of the Arkansas Industrial Development Commission, Rockefeller convened members of the AIDC, along with a number of experts, at his farm atop Petit Jean Mountain to iron out a roadmap to economic development success. The result was 600 new industries, 90,000 new jobs and $240 million in new salaries. In the 21st century global economy, though, our state and region must again creatively adapt in order to survive and thrive. As a key catalyst in that process, the Winthrop Rockefeller Institute convenes government, business and other leaders to tackle the challenges Arkansas faces and advance the solutions that will drive us forward.

Health

Continuing the Rockefeller family tradition of support for scientific research, the Winthrop Rockefeller Institute plays an active role in advancing both clinical medicine and public health, not only offering educational health retreats and workshops for the public, but also partnering with leading researchers and institutions to convene conferences that further understanding, disseminate knowledge and propose solutions in a variety of areas — ranging from Arkansas' public health issues to the use of nanotechnology in health care.

Arkansas Dicamba Task Force

An 18-member task force representing a cross-section of those most affected by the issues surrounding dicamba use was convened and brought to the Winthrop Rockefeller Institute to undergo a facilitated, dialogue-driven decision-making process. Institute facilitators served as impartial, independent mediators, guiding the task force through an examination of all sides of the issue, not only from the task force members themselves, but also from advisory members representing academic researchers and scientists as well as researchers from dicamba product manufacturers and Arkansas Agriculture Department conveners.

Uncommon Communities

Uncommon Communities Year III will kick-off on Thursday, September 7, 2017 at the Fine Arts Building Auditorium on the University of Arkansas Community College at Morrilton's campus.The workshops, offered exclusively to Uncommon Communities participants, will explore how city and community leaders can foster a culture of leadership across all sectors, disciplines, generations, and county lines to make bold investments in their future. 

 

 

Historic Theaters Conference

Historic Theaters are the hubs of smaller communities. Too often they are neglected or don't have enough programming to sustain them. The Winthrop Rockefeller Institute in partnership with the Department of Arkansas Heritage, Arkansas Historic Preservation Program and Arkansas Arts Council is working to change that. Join us for sessions on programming your historic theater, fundraising, marketing, historic building issues and more. Meet with your peers from across the state and learn what the other 22 historic theaters in the state are doing to keep arts, history and quality of place alive! 

We're Not Telling You Everything

We are excited to host northwest Arkansas photographers Don House and Sabine Schmidt's exhibition We’re Not Telling You Everything: Words and Images from the Wichita Mountains through the month of August. This exhibit will be on display in the Institute's Flagstone Foyer and Show Barn Hall from Friday, Aug. 4, to Thursday, Aug. 31, 2017, with a special opening reception and artist talk from 3-4:30 p.m. on Thursday, Aug. 3. Admission to the reception is free, but we ask that those interested preregister.

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